Minsk Agreement Text Osce

The new package, commonly known as “Minsk II,” has been criticized as “highly complicated” and “extremely fragile,” and very similar to the failed Minsk Protocol. [5] [34] [35] The New York Times reported that the plan contained “a few stumbling wires,” such as for example. B the non-delimitation of control of the town of Debaltséwe, which was the site of the most violent fighting at the time of the drawing up of the plan. [5] [36] Following the Minsk talks, Chancellor Merkel, President Hollande and President Poroshenko attended a European Union (EU) summit in Brussels. [37] At the summit, the Minsk participants briefed the EU Heads of State and Government on the discussions. At the briefing, they said president Putin had tried to delay the implementation of a ceasefire by ten days to force Debaltsewe`s Ukrainian troops to abandon their positions. Both sides said they would not withdraw heavy weapons, as provided for in the agreement, as fighting continued in Debaltsevé. [51] Reuters called the ceasefire “stillborn” in Debaltsewe. [52] Ukrainian forces had to withdraw from Debaltsev on February 18, so separatist forces had control of the city. [53] On April 18, 2016, the scheduled municipal elections (organized by the DVR and the LPR) were postponed from April 20 to July 24, 2016.

[74] On July 22, 2016, these DVR and LPR elections were again postponed to November 6, 2016. [75] On October 2, 2016, the DVR and the LPR held “primaries” in which voters nominated candidates for the November 6, 2016 elections. [76] Ukraine condemned these “primaries” as illegal. [76] On November 4, 2016, both the DVR and the LPR postponed their municipal elections “until further notice”; DVR chief Zakharchenko added: “In 2017 we will hold elections within the framework of the Minsk agreements or hold them independently.” [Citation required] 9. . . .